Health Central – Low vitamin D linked to dementia
A new study published in the journal Neurology concludes that low levels of vitamin D are associated with Alzheimer’s disease and also that many older adults have severely low levels of the vitamin, putting them at a much greater risk for dementia.
The researchers tested 1,658 dementia-free people aged over 65 who had participated in the US population-based Cardiovascular Health Study. The vitamin D levels in their blood were tested, and they were followed up for an average of 5.6 years. During this follow-up period, 171 of the participants developed dementia and 102 participants developed Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers found the participants with low levels of vitamin D were 53 percent more likely to develop dementia, and those who were severely deficient were 125 percent more likely, when compared with participants with regular levels of vitamin D.

FOX News – FDA warns that tattoo inks can cause skin infections
The Food and Drug Administration is warning tattoo parlors, their customers and those buying at-home tattoo kits that not all tattoo ink is safe.
Last month, California company White and Blue Lion Inc. recalled inks in in-home tattoo kits after testing confirmed bacterial contamination in unopened bottles.
At least one skin infection has been linked to the company’s products, and FDA officials say they are aware of other reports of infections linked to tattoo inks with similar packaging.
Infections from tattooing are nothing new. Hepatitis, staph infections and even the superbug known as MRSA have been tied to tattoos. Dirty needles and unsanitary environments are often to blame.

ABC News – Obama: Public health focus can curb Ebola outbreak
President Barack Obama says the Ebola virus is controllable with standard public health measures and the U.S. is working with allies to send additional medical workers to West Africa.
The use of an experimental drug to treat American aid workers raises ethical questions about who should get any additional, limited supplies of a drug that’s never been tested in people. Obama says all the information isn’t in about whether the drug is helping.
In his words, “We’ve got to let the science guide us.”

NPR – California experiments with fast-tracking medical school
Some doctors in the state of California will soon be able to practice after three years of medical school instead of the traditional four. The American Medical Association is providing seed money for the effort in the form of a $1 million, five-year grant to the University of California at Davis.
Student Ngabo Nzigira is in his sixth week of medical school and he’s already interacting with patients during training with a doctor at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento.
In a traditional med school, Nzigira wouldn’t be in a clinic until his third year. In this accelerated course, students can shave up to $60,000 off the cost of their medical education. But Nzigira had hesitations.