The New York Times – House Republican Budget Overhauls Medicare and Repeals the Health Law
House Republicans on Tuesday will unveil a proposed budget for 2016 that partly privatizes Medicare, turns Medicaid into block grants to the states, repeals the Affordable Care Act and reaches balance in 10 years, challenging Republicans in Congress to make good on their promises to deeply cut federal spending.
The House proposal leans heavily on the policy prescriptions that Representative Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin outlined when he was budget chairman, according to senior House Republican aides and members of Congress who were not authorized to speak in advance of the official release.

Reuters – FDA panel to discuss Ebola vaccine development in May
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said an advisory panel will discuss the development of Ebola vaccines, days after an American health worker was flown back after being tested positive for Ebola in Sierra Leone.
The federal health regulator would discuss the development of vaccines on May 12, it announced on its website on Wednesday.

The Washington Post – Kraft recalls more than 6 million boxes of macaroni and cheese because they may contain metal
Kraft is voluntarily recalling thousands of cases of its original-flavored macaroni and cheese due to a concern that some boxes may contain pieces of metal, the company announced Tuesday.
According to Kraft, eight consumer complaints have been logged about the product, but there have been no reported injuries. “We deeply regret this situation and apologize to any consumers we have disappointed,” Kraft said in a statement.

USA Today – Insurers move gradually toward wellness care
Cigna insurance CEO David Cordani says the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services’ recent payment changes that emphasize quality over quantity in healthcare will shift the focus on “sick care to more well care.” But a widespread embrace of diet, fitness and other wellness programs is still a way off,
“As a country, we’re in a transitional state in many ways,” he says.

NPR – Workplace Suicide Rates Rise Sharply
Suicide rates in the U.S. have gone up considerably in recent years, claiming an average of 36,000 lives annually.
Most people take their lives in or near home. But suicide on the job is also increasing and, according to federal researchers, suicide risk changes depending on the type of work people do.
Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health analyzed census data and compared suicide rates among different occupations.