The New York Times -A Milestone in Africa: No Polio Cases in a Year
It has been one full year since polio was detected anywhere in Africa, a significant milestone in global health that has left health experts around the world quietly celebrating.
The goal had seemed tantalizingly close in recent years, but polio always managed to roar back, particularly in Nigeria. Then officials embraced a vigorous new approach to vaccination and surveillance in that country, hiring thousands of community “mobilizers” to track down the unvaccinated, opening operations centers nationwide to monitor progress and seeking out support from clerics and tribal chiefs.

Reuters Health – Trans fats, but not saturated fats, linked to risk of death
A large new review of existing research suggests that for healthy people, a reasonable amount of saturated fat in the diet poses no health risk.
Trans fats, on the other hand, were associated with an increased risk of death from any cause, death from cardiovascular disease and a diagnosis of coronary heart disease.

USA Today – Federal report: 7 million fewer Americans uninsured this year
The number of Americans without health insurance dropped from 36 million last year to 29 million in the first quarter of this year, according to the latest in a string of reports showing uninsured rates are on the decline.
The newest report, released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics on Wednesday, contains early estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, which are based on data for 26,121 people from across the nation. The estimate of 29 million, which represents 9.2% of Americans, reflects the portion of respondents who reported being uninsured at the time of the interview.

NPR – Women In Combat Zones Can Have Trouble Getting Contraceptives
Next year, the military will officially lift restrictions on women in combat, the end of a process that, according to the Government Accountability Office, may open up as many as 245,000 jobs that have been off-limits to women. But those who deploy overseas may continue to face obstacles in another area that can have a critical impact on their military experience: contraception.
It’s not a minor issue. Rates of unintended pregnancy among women in the military are about 50 percent higher than those of women in the general population. And because of strict federal rules, their health insurance does not generally cover abortion.