If you were listening to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address last night, you heard a litany of refrains on health. From touting accomplishments on improving access to care, beating infectious disease and tackling climate change to laying out priorities for 2016, including strengthening Medicare and cancer research, the president’s remarks embraced a robust health agenda.

For those of you who missed it or if you’d like a recap, here’s our tally of public health highlights featured during his speech to the nation.

State of the Union 2016

President Barack Obama delivers his final State of the Union address. Photo courtesy WhiteHouse.gov

On the Affordable Care Act: “And for Americans short of retirement, basic benefits should be just as mobile as everything else is today. That’s what the Affordable Care Act is all about. It’s about filling the gaps in employer-based care so that when we lose a job, or go back to school, or start that new business, we’ll still have coverage. Nearly 18 million have gained coverage so far. Health care inflation has slowed. And our businesses have created jobs every single month since it became law.”

On climate change: “Look, if anybody still wants to dispute the science around climate change, have at it. You’ll be pretty lonely, because you’ll be debating our military, most of America’s business leaders, the majority of the American people, almost the entire scientific community, and 200 nations around the world who agree it’s a problem and intend to solve it. … Meanwhile, we’ve cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly sixty percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

On Ebola and infectious disease: “That’s why we built a global coalition, with sanctions and principled diplomacy. … That’s how we stopped the spread of Ebola in West Africa. Our military, our doctors, and our development workers set up the platform that allowed other countries to join us in stamping out that epidemic.”

On HIV and malaria: “When we help African countries feed their people and care for the sick, that prevents the next pandemic from reaching our shores. Right now, we are on track to end the scourge of HIV/AIDS, and we have the capacity to accomplish the same thing with malaria – something I’ll be pushing this Congress to fund this year.”

On paid leave from work for sick employees, gun violence and the minimum wage: “And I’ll keep pushing for progress on the work that still needs doing. … Protecting our kids from gun violence. Equal pay for equal work, paid leave, raising the minimum wage. All these things still matter to hardworking families; they are still the right thing to do; and I will not let up until they get done.”

On Social Security and Medicare: “Of course, a great education isn’t all we need in this new economy. We also need benefits and protections that provide a basic measure of security. … Americans understand that at some point in their careers, they may have to retool and retrain. But they shouldn’t lose what they’ve already worked so hard to build. That’s why Social Security and Medicare are more important than ever; we shouldn’t weaken them, we should strengthen them.”

On cancer research and control: “Last year, Vice President Biden said that with a new moonshot, America can cure cancer. Last month, he worked with this Congress to give scientists at the National Institutes of Health the strongest resources they’ve had in over a decade. Tonight, I’m announcing a new national effort to get it done.”

On education and high school graduation: “We agree that real opportunity requires every American to get the education and training they need to land a good-paying job. The bipartisan reform of No Child Left Behind was an important start, and together, we’ve increased early childhood education, lifted high school graduation rates to new highs. … In the coming years, we should build on that progress, by providing Pre-K for all, offering every student the hands-on computer science and math classes that make them job-ready on day one, and we should recruit and support more great teachers for our kids.”

And if you missed our state of public health with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Freiden, you can read it here on Public Health Newswire.