The New York Times  Trump says health law replacement may not be ready until next year
President Trump said in an interview that aired on Sunday that a replacement health care law was not likely to be ready until either the end of this year or in 2018, a major shift from promises by both him and Republican leaders to repeal and replace the law as soon as possible.

STAT — A dangerous wait: Colleges can’t meet soaring student needs for mental health care
Colleges across the country are failing to keep up with a troubling spike in demand for mental health care — leaving students stuck on waiting lists for weeks, unable to get help. Students often have to wait weeks just for an initial intake exam to review their symptoms. The wait to see a psychiatrist who can prescribe or adjust medication — often a part-time employee — may be longer still.

Reuters  Study of cancer-causing toxins finds e-cigarettes much safer than smoking
Consuming e-cigarettes is far safer and less toxic than smoking conventional tobacco cigarettes, according to the findings of a study analyzing levels of dangerous and cancer-causing substances in the body. Researchers found that people who switched from smoking regular cigarettes to e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) such as gum or patches for at least six months had much lower levels of toxins in their saliva and urine than those who continued to smoke.

The Washington Post  Hundreds of current, former EPA employees urge Senate to reject Trump’s nominee for the agency
Nearly 450 former Environmental Protection Agency employees Monday urged Congress to reject President Trump’s nominee to run the agency, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt. Current employees in Chicago sent the same message during a noon rally.

Associated Press  ‘Obamacare’ sign-ups show slippage in Trump era
Facing higher premiums, less choice and a last-minute advertising pullback, fewer people signed up for coverage this year, according to data from a preliminary government report Friday. About 9.2 million people signed up through HealthCare.gov, the insurance marketplace serving most states, said the Health and Human Services department. That’s about 500,000 fewer customers than had enrolled last year in those same 39 states, or slippage of around 5 percent.