The New York Times – Fat bias starts early and takes a serious toll
A very slender friend recently admitted to me that she “can’t stand to be around fat people.” Her reaction is almost visceral, and it prompts her to avoid social and professional contact with people who are seriously overweight. Although she can’t pinpoint the source of her feelings, she said they go back as far as she can remember. And she is hardly alone. Decades ago, researchers found that weight-based bias, which is often accompanied by overt discrimination and bullying, can date back to childhood, sometimes as early as age 3. The prejudiced feelings may not be apparent to those who hold them, yet they can strongly influence someone’s behavior.

Kaiser Health News – Home visits help parents overcome tough histories, raise healthy children
Seated at a kitchen table in a cramped apartment, Rosendo Gil asks the parents sitting across from him what they should do if their daughter catches a cold. Blas Lopez, 29, and his fiancée, Lluvia Padilla, 28, are quick with the answer: Check her temperature and call the doctor if she has a fever they can’t control. “I’m very proud of both of you knowing what to do,” Gil says, as 3-year-old Leilanie Lopez plays with a pretend kitchen nearby. Gil and other home visitors around the nation face a daunting task: to help new parents raise healthy children and overcome poverty, substance abuse, depression and domestic violence.

STAT – As White House appoints pro-vaccine officials, plan for safety commission appears stalled
Robert Kennedy Jr., the environmental activist and leading vaccine skeptic, says that it has been months since he has talked with White House officials about chairing a vaccine safety commission — and that the idea of such a panel may no longer be under consideration. Kennedy said, however, he has met with a series of top administration officials about vaccine safety since Trump took office, including officials at the upper ranks of the Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health.

Reuters – U.S. study revives arguments over mammogram screening
Yearly mammograms starting at age 40 would prevent the most deaths from breast cancer, U.S. researchers reported on Monday in a challenge to more conservative recommendations that take into account both the harms and the benefits of screening. The study, led by Dr. Elizabeth Arleo, a radiologist specializing in mammography at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, found that yearly mammograms between the age of 40 and 80 could cut breast cancer deaths by 40 percent.

ABC News – Former health chiefs to Trump: Avoid new ‘Obamacare’ crisis
Don’t make things worse. That’s the advice of former U.S. health secretaries of both parties to President Donald Trump and the GOP-led Congress, now that “Obamacare” seems here for the foreseeable future. The 2018 sign-up season for subsidized private health plans starts Nov. 1, with about 10 million people currently served through HealthCare.gov and its state counterparts. Stability should be the immediate goal, said former Health and Human Services secretaries Kathleen Sebelius, Mike Leavitt and Tommy Thompson.