Politico — ‘Katrina brain’: The invisible long-term toll of megastorms
More than 1,800 people died in Katrina from drowning and other immediate injuries. But public health officials say that, in the aftermath of an extreme weather event like a hurricane, the toll of long-term psychological injuries builds in the months and years that follow, outpacing more immediate injuries and swamping the health care system long after emergency workers go home and shelters shut down. That’s the rough reality that will soon confront regions affected by this year’s string of destructive hurricanes.

ABC News — Women’s health docs say Trump ignores birth control science
The Trump administration’s new birth control rule is raising questions among some women’s health experts, who say it overlooks known benefits of contraception while selectively citing data that raise doubts about effectiveness and safety. “This rule is listing things that are not scientifically validated, and in some cases things that are wrong, to try to justify a decision that is not in the best interests of women and society,” said Dr. Hal Lawrence, CEO of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which represents women’s health specialists.

NPR — Obesity in children and teens rose sharply worldwide over past 4 decades
In just over four decades, obesity levels in children and teenagers have risen dramatically worldwide, though that rise has been far from uniform. In a new study published online Tuesday British researchers and the World Health Organization say those levels have plateaued lately in high-income countries, “albeit at high levels,” while the rise in obesity rates has only accelerated in regions such as East Asia and Latin America.

STAT — An old-school pharmacy hand-delivers drugs to Congress, a little-known perk for the powerful
Nearly every day for at least two decades pharmaceutical drugs have been brought by the carload to the Capitol — an arrangement so under the radar that even pharmacy lobbyists who regularly pitch Congress on their industry aren’t aware of it. The deliveries arrive at the secretive Office of the Attending Physician, an elaborate medical clinic where Navy doctors triage medical emergencies and provide basic health care for lawmakers who pay an annual fee of just over $600.

The New York Times — Why are more American teenagers then ever suffering from severe anxiety?
Over the last decade, anxiety has overtaken depression as the most common reason college students seek counseling services. In its annual survey of students, the American College Health Association found a significant increase — to 62 percent in 2016 from 50 percent in 2011 — of undergraduates reporting “overwhelming anxiety” in the previous year.