The FDA’s new tobacco warnings caused a stir when the new images were released last month. At the very least, they’ve got people talking about how graphic the images are. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, the American Heart Association and the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids applaud the new graphic images that will soon cover cigarette packages and appear on tobacco ads.

 “These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking and they will help encourage smokers to quit, and prevent children from smoking,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement.

The FDA has chosen nine new warnings shown to be most effective at increasing awareness of the health risks associated with smoking, such as death, addiction, lung disease, cancer, stroke and heart disease. One graphic, for example, shows a sore-infested mouth with stained, rotted teeth, and the words “Warning: Cigarettes cause cancer.” Another depicts a corpse in a coffin, with the words: “Warning: Smoking can kill you.”

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Beginning September 2012 smokers will see the startling new graphics when tobacco companies change their packaging to comply with a Food and Drug Administration law. The Tobacco Control Act requires that the top half of the front and back of cigarette packs be covered with text and a large, disturbing image that warn of the health consequences of smoking.  The law also says cigarette ads must contain the graphic images and text warning.

 

The current text-only warnings are more than 25 years old, go unnoticed on the side of cigarette packs and don’t effectively relay the risks of smoking, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.  With the new warnings, the United States is catching up to scientific research and joining other countries that already require large, graphic warnings on tobacco products.

What do you think of the warning labels? 

The current text-only warnings are more than 25 years old, go unnoticed on the side of cigarette packs and don’t effectively relay the risks of smoking, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.  With the new warnings, the United States is catching up to scientific research and joining other countries that already require large, graphic warnings on tobacco products.

What do you think of the warning labels?