In the 1920s, Americans smoked less than they do now. Why does 'Gatsby' tell another story?In a new ad, a coalition of health groups questions the prevalence of smoking in the new box office hit “The Great Gatsby.”

The ad, from Smoke Free Movies, notes that the classic novel on which the movie is based mentions smoking eight times, but the film depicts more than 150 smoking incidents. The headline asks: “In the 1920s, Americans smoked less than they do now. Why does Gatsby tell another story?”

The Baz Luhrmann-directed feature is rated PG-13. The ad argues that a movie that shows smoking — “unless it depicts a real person who smoked or else the real consequences of smoking” — should require an R rating.

“The more smoking kids see, whether it’s phony history or comic book fantasy, the more likely they’ll smoke,” the copy explains.

The ad, targeting the movie industry, runs this week in Variety and Hollywood Reporter. Smoke Free Movie policies, including the R rating and other anti-tobacco initiatives, are endorsed by APHA and other groups.