BBC – Scientists take big step towards universal flu vaccine
The influenza virus is a constantly shifting target so seasonal flu vaccines rapidly become useless and new ones are needed each year.
A team at Imperial College London say they have made a “blueprint” for a universal flu vaccine.
Their discovery is published in the journal Nature Medicine.
Influenza is able to change the proteins that protrude from the surface of the virus as readily as people change outfits.

Huffington Post – Global rate of HIV infection, AIDS-related deaths dramatically reduced: UN
The global rate of HIV infection and the number of AIDS-related deaths have been dramatically reduced, thanks to expanding access to treatment, the United Nations said in a report issued on Monday.
In its annual update on HIV, which it said now infects around 35.3 million people worldwide, UNAIDS said deaths from AIDS and HIV infection rates were falling, while the number of people getting treatment is going up.

Forbes – How college health centers help students succeed
Of all the dramatic changes in higher education in recent years, one that goes largely unnoticed is the tremendous growth in the mission, services, and facilities of health centers. Decades ago most colleges and universities believed their only responsibility for student health was to set up a clinic to treat the sick and injured. Today, driven by a broader and, in our judgment, better understanding of health and its impact on learning, many institutions of higher education provide much more.

Health Day – HEALTH REFORM: Young adults may be key to making it all work
Few uninsured young adults know about the state health insurance exchanges opening for business on Oct. 1, surveys show. But even if they did, would they snap up health coverage?
The answer to that question is one of the great unknowns as states prepare to roll out the exchanges, or marketplaces, which are a key feature of the Obama administration’s health reform law.

NPR – Report: Cases of elderly dementia to nearly triple by 2050
By the middle of the century, the number of older people suffering from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia will nearly triple, severely straining caregiving resources, the charity Alzheimer’s Disease International says in a new study released Thursday.
Currently, some 100 million people globally suffer from the potentially fatal disease. That number is expected to increase to 277 million by 2050, as the graying population increases, The World Alzheimer’s Report 2013 says.

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